Diagnostic Logging Enhancements in SharePoint 2010

One of the big things I am happy that has been “upgraded” from SharePoint 2007 to SharePoint 2010 is diagnostic logging. Let’s take a look and see at a few of the more important features for what has been improved from v12… (at least my favorites, your mileage may vary).

Event Throttling
Let’s take Event Throttling for example. In 2007, you had a clunky drop-down menu to managing your throttling, and, you could only manage one at a time, or, all at once.

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Now, in 2010, you can manage throttling for multiple services at once
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And event see at a glance what each service is throttled to, without needing to select the service from the drop-down menu, to see the event level box values change.

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Such a time saver! Definitely makes my life a heck of a lot easier as a developer.

Event Log Flood Protection

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Event log flood protection – just as it states above – it suppresses duplicates messages for repeating errors. Just as I am sure some of you have probably seen in the past if you’re search service goes belly up, you get THOUSANDS of messages in short succession. This option, when enabled (default) will suppress those messages, so you do not end up seeing those THOUSANDS of the same message, over and over again.

Trace Log
The trace log configuration has undergone a few upgrades itself. Take a look back at the 2007 configuration…

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You could set the where, number of files, and the minutes to use a log file, before moving onto the next one. Wow… that just isn’t all too helpful. Now, let’s have a look at the shiny new 2010 Trace Log configuration.

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Ok, so, we didn’t get 50 additional configuration options, but, the ones we do have now are light years ahead of 2007 (in my humble opinion…)

We can now set the number of days to store log files on the server (14 by default), and we can now also restrict the total disk space used by the log files! This is not enabled by default, but, I think this is a best practice, even before the best practices have really be written down, to enable this option immediately, and to something less than the size of the disk available. Full disk = bad.

Also, and this is not a configuration option that you can tweak in Central Admin, but, if you take a look in the logs directory in your 14 Hive (ahem!) sorry, the SharePoint Root folder, you will see that the log files are now being compressed by default! I did this anyways in 2003 and 2007, and eons before with any websites, they just now thought of this? In any event, it saves me a step in server configuration.

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Logging to the database!
Check this out. Open up the SQL Management Studio, and expand your databases. You’ll notice a nice new one (among others), named WSS_Logging. Go ahead, check it out…. you will see there are quite a few tables. Most of them are partitioned up, so not too many records are stored within one specific table

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However, they were kind enough to create views for us as well
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which greatly simplifies hunting for that needle in a haystack. You will also, see, the very last view, ULSTraceLog. Yes, the ULS log is now also contained within the database as well!

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This is just absolutely phenomenal. How many times I coped out the ULS logs into an excel sheet (painstakingly, especially since they can be huge files), to sort, filter, and search the data. Or, looking and trying to search the ULS logs within Notepad? UGH! This makes my life so. much. easier. Another awesome thing about this? NETWORK ACCESSIBLE LOGS! Yes! You can now access these from anywhere SQL gives you access to, easily write your own applications to parse the data, use SQL Reporting Services to merge logs from your entire farm, or multiple farms… the possibilities are endless.

Also, you will see that all events that get written back to the server Event Log for all of the servers in your farm? Yep, those can now be accessed in SQL as well, in the NTEventLog table. Awesome.

These are just a few of the many enhancements in SharePoint 2010, more to come soon!

 

Right from the Source – Custom Actions in SharePoint 2010

Just wanted to share this with my readers – Andrew May from the SharePoint Developer Documentation Team, posted a great article on the Microsoft SharePoint Developer Documentation Team Blog yesterday, regarding Custom Actions in SharePoint 2010, specifically, adding a tab with custom actions to the Ribbon interface in SharePoint Foundation Server 2010. This is a good read, straight from the source of the documentation folks themselves at Microsoft.

If you are interested in developing Custom Actions in 2010 – this is a great resource: How to Add a Tab to the Ribbon in SharePoint Foundation

 

WCF Hotfix (KB976462) for Windows Server 2008 R2

Additional SharePoint 2010 Beta 2 Installation Links…

SharePoint 2010 Beta 2 Installation and Configuration Visual Tour

This is a quick visual guide to installing and configuring Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 Beta 2, as it is from my experience. My environment is configured as such:

  • Virtual Image running on VMWare Player, on top of Windows 7 Enterprise x64
  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • SQL Server 2008 SP1 CU2
  • AD, SQL, and SharePoint all co-existing on the same virtual image

This tour will not encompass the SQL or AD configuration however. Possibly in a later post I will cover those, but, just wanted to share the experience of configuring this beauty from a first-timer’s perspective. My friend Erik Kraus has a nice post with details and links to great sources of information regarding prerequisites, and installation instructions here: http://blogs.msdn.com/ekraus/archive/2009/11/17/sharepoint-2010-beta-2-is-finally-here.aspx

First, you will need to download the beta, then double click the executable file, and you’re off to the races.

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Checking the first option allows you to review the hardware and software requirements for SharePoint 2010. These are important! I suggest you do so before continuing. Once you have read these, it also make sense to read the installation guide.

Once you have read up on the requirements and installation procedures, it is time to move on down the line to the Install software prerequisites action. This will run through the SharePoint Products and Technologies 2010 Preparation tool, which as the screenshot below dictates, it installs and configures the following products:

  • Application Server Role
  • Web Server (IIS) Role
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Native Client
  • Microsoft “Geneva” Framework Runtime
  • Microsoft Sync Framework Runtime v1.0 (x64)
  • Microsoft Chart Controls fro Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5
  • Microsoft Filter Pack 2.0
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services ADOMD.NET

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Click Next >

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Agree to the EULA and click Next >

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The tool will then run through its paces, and if all goes well, you will see the following screen, letting you know that all the prerequisites have been installed or enabled.

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You will now be back at the trusty splash screen. Go ahead and click on Install SharePoint Server

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Then enter in your product key, which will be validated, and once so, the Continue button will light up. Click it.

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Agree to another EULA and click Continue

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In this “Choose Your Own Adventure” story, I selected Server Farm.

Editor’s Note: Unfortunately I missed a screenshot here, of the Server Type screen. I hope to have a screenshot of it here shortly. Onwards!

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Next, on the File Location screen, these are the defaults, which I kept, as I only have the one partition on my virtual image. Then click Install Now if you are fine with these settings

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The installation begins! Once this process finishes, you will be presented with the following screen to run the SharePoint Products and Technologies Configuration Wizard – let’s do that.

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The wizard will then load. Go ahead and click Next > to begin.

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You’ll get this familiar pop-up.. go ahead and click Yes.

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Choose Create a new server farm and click Next >

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Here you will need to specify your database configuration settings. Fill those in and click Next >

If by chance you are not “up to code” on your version of SQL, you will get this error

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Otherwise, you will see this next screen

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Here, you will specify a password for your new SharePoint farm. As it states above, the password “is used to secure farm configuration data and is required for each server that joins the farm”. It also states that it can be changed, but, you may want to jot this down somewhere. Once entered, click Next >

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Specify the Central Administration port (I am partial to 9999), or let it auto-assign a random port for you. And choose your authentication method. I stuck with NTLM for now. This can be changed later on. If you decided on Kerberos here, you’d get this message after clicking Next >

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But I didn’t, so we didn’t see that…. so after clicking Next > we see the following summary screen.

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Click Next > here to apply these settings, or, click < Back to go back and change these if needed.

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This will then kick off into the 10 step configuration process.

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On successful configuration, and clicking Finish, you will be directed into Central Administration to the following URL: http://sp2010dev-01:9999/_admin/adminconfigintro.aspx?scenarioid=adminconfig&welcomestringid=farmconfigurationwizard_welcome

And you can see your new baby for the first time. Awww… so sweet and cuddly. I think I’ll name her Jane.

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You will first be prompted to join the Customer Experience Improvement Program, I selected yes, and went on my merry way.

That is it for now… more to come soon! Thanks for watching.

 

The service application proxy “User Profile Service Application” could not be provisioned because of the following error: Unrecognized attribute ‘allowInsecureTransport’.

So, here I am, going through my installation of the SharePoint 2010, and received my first error! The error (full text below), came while configuring the services via the Initial Farm Configuration Wizard

Errors occured.

The service application proxy "User Profile Service Application" could not be provisioned because of the following error: Unrecognized attribute ‘allowInsecureTransport’. Note that attribute names are case-sensitive. (C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\WebClients\Profile\client.config line 56)

Corelation Id: bf7f0c8a-97f2-4250-b4e5-04c4d74eff3e

DOH! In addition to this error, not only is this halting my forward progress, and not this has anything really to do with anything, but, hopefully they run a spell check before this gets to RTM. There are two spelling mistakes in the message above (bolded and underlined). Anyways, I did a bit of searching on the interwebs for this, and it appears that it is a known issue on both Windows 7, and, Server 2008 R2, the latter of which I am running.

It appears that there is a fix coming down the pipe from Microsoft, according to this post on the SharePoint TechNet Forums: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/sharepoint2010general/thread/041ddc78-8d18-4753-b7be-8d8113e26e62, as there is an issue with WCF on the two aforementioned platforms, as they share the same core.

There are also workarounds posted (like here: http://mphacker.spaces.live.com/Blog/cns!8040CC624DDC5404!790.entry), however, these come in the form of modifying a file within the “SharePoint Root” [14 Hive] (the file mentioned in the error). This is unsupported, but, guess what, so is the Beta copy of SharePoint 2010. However, in the article above, some issues have arisen by modifying the file directly.

There is no release date that I am aware of for the patch, however, a search on Google nets the following

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It appears it was there at some point, however, it has since been removed (“Sorry, but we couldn’t find the page that you requested.”). I’ll make another post as soon as I see it comes out. In the meantime, I am holding off on my installation until the fix comes out so I can have a “clean” fresh install.

UPDATE: Hotfix has been released! WCF Hotfix (KB976462) for Windows Server 2008 R2 

 

Yet another beautiful day…

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Did I mention I was excited? After all of this hype, and my excessive drooling at the SharePoint Conference this year… I am installing SharePoint 2010.

A word of caution before installing the SharePoint 2010 Public Beta

I received an email from Bjørn Furuknap today, and was delighted with what it contained. So I do not steal his thunder, give a read (link below) BEFORE you go installing the beta to save you some hassle.

http://furuknap.blogspot.com/2009/11/installing-sharepoint-2010-beta-2-how.html

** Updated 11.17.09 **

A reader of my blog, Arif, posted this morning in the comments, that it can definitely be done using local accounts – he was kind enough to share this link from the SharePoint From The Field Blog: http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blogs/fromthefield/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=112 Thanks Arif!

 

 

It’s A Beautiful Day!

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I think the above image speaks for itself. The public BETA of Office SharePoint Foundation Server 2010 (WSS) and Office SharePoint Server 2010 have been released today. Currently only to TechNet and MSDN subscribers. Thankfully, I fit in that group, and am downloading my copies now. I know what I am doing tonight!

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Now that it is available, I am sure I will be belting out LOTS of posts on some of the new features!

 ** UPDATED 11.18.09 **

The public beta is now available through Microsoft’s SharePoint 2010 site here: http://sharepoint2010.microsoft.com/try-it/Pages/Trial.aspx

 

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