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Speaking at SharePoint Saturday San Juan

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I am pleased to announce I will be speaking at SharePoint Saturday San Juan on November 3rd.

Register today at http://www.spsevents.org/city/sanjuan/sanjuan2018

The Microsoft Office 365 and Cloud community invites you to the second 365 & SharePoint office on Saturday to be held in San Juan.

It is a totally free event in which you will find technical and development sessions focused on Microsoft Collaboration tools such as SharePoint, Office 365, Integration with Azure, Power Apps, Flow, Project, Planner, OneDrive, Delve, SharePoint Framework, Power BI, Dynamics CRM, Blockchain among others. We will have the company of MVPs and specialized technical leaders in each of the different types of talks.

I will be presenting Using Azure Runbooks and Microsoft Flow to Automate SharePoint Tasks

Session Abstract

Runbooks are a feature of Azure Automation that allow you to execute workflows from within Azure or remotely to automate processes. Microsoft Flow allows you to attach to certain activities in SharePoint and across other platforms, to perform a task when a certain condition is met. In this session, you will learn how to link SharePoint Online, Microsoft Flow, and Azure Runbooks in order to execute scripts automatically against your SharePoint tenant, or really, perform or automate any task.

Hope to see you there!

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Speaking at SharePoint Saturday New England 2018

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I am pleased to announce I will be speaking at SharePoint Saturday New England. Taking place on Saturday, October 20th, at the Microsoft office in Burlington, MA.

Register today at https://spsnewengland.org/

Carrying on the great tradition of SharePoint Saturday started by Michael Lotter, Susan Lennon, and Kevin Israel on January 10th, 2009 in Virginia Beach, we hope to welcome you to SharePoint Saturday New England.

Join New England area SharePoint architects, developers, and information workers for SharePoint Saturday: an educational, informative and lively day filled with sessions from other SharePoint professionals, MVPs, and Microsoft employees. SharePoint Saturday is FREE, open to the public and is your chance to immerse yourself in SharePoint right here in New England!

I will be presenting Using Azure Runbooks and Microsoft Flow to Automate SharePoint Tasks

Session Abstract

Runbooks are a feature of Azure Automation that allow you to execute workflows from within Azure or remotely to automate processes. Microsoft Flow allows you to attach to certain activities in SharePoint and across other platforms, to perform a task when a certain condition is met. In this session, you will learn how to link SharePoint Online, Microsoft Flow, and Azure Runbooks in order to execute scripts automatically against your SharePoint tenant, or really, perform or automate any task.

Hope to see you there!

Boston Area SharePoint Users Group February 13, 2018 Meeting

Hey, guess what? I’m speaking at the BASPUG in February… come join me! We’ve moved to a new night – Tuesday, works better for everyone who helps out with the group.

Read the below for more information, and click here to register!

The Boston Area SharePoint Users Group (BASPUG) was founded to bring together like minds to network and share their experiences, triumphs, and tribulations around Microsoft SharePoint, to provide a community platform for Boston area SharePoint users, administrators, developers, architects, of all experience levels, even brand new to SharePoint, to share their knowledge with the community.

Geoff Varosky will be presenting “Easily Integrating a Chat Bot into SharePoint”

Session Abstract

​Chat Bots are very commonplace these days. They have been around for years, but advances in AI technology have allowed for a large growth and advances in this area. Microsoft has in preview a service called QnA Maker, that will allow you to create and build a Chat Bot that you can easily integrate into SharePoint using the Azure Bot Framework, all without writing a single line of code. Join me, and I’ll walk you through step-by-step on this process, along with discussing how and where Chat Bots can be used to provide better adoption and support to your users.

About the Speaker

​Geoff Varosky is a Senior Architect for BlueMetal, a division of Insight, based out of Watertown, MA. He has been architecting and developing web based applications his entire career, and has been working with SharePoint for the past 13 years. Geoff is an active member of the SharePoint community, Co-Founder and Co-Organizer of the Boston Area SharePoint Users Group, co-founder for the Boston Office 365 Users Group, co-organizer for SharePoint Saturday New England.

MEETING SPONSOR – BlueMetal

​Modern technology, craftsman quality. We’re an interactive design and technology architecture firm matching the most experienced consultants in the industry to the most challenging business and technical problems facing our clients. We seek to understand your business strategy and technical foundation to craft modern applications that holistically blend strategic vision, creative design, architecture, and innovation, to exactly meet your needs and ensure your success.​​

SUSTENANCE

Food and beverages will be provided at the meeting free of charge from our meeting sponsor. Food arrives at about 6PM. We generally have pizza (with and without meat), as well a salad, water, and sodas.​​

RAFFLE PRIZES

We will be handing out raffle tickets at the BASPUG meetings.

LOCATION

The meeting will be held at the BlueMetal Boston Office at 9 Galen St, Suite 300, Watertown, MA.​ Parking is FREE, and available in the main lot, and behind the building along the river.
Walk in the main building entrace (not the side of the bus stop), go to the back, take the elevator up to the 3rd floor, and the BlueMetal office is right in front of the elevator.

LINKED IN
Join our group on LinkedIn today to connect with the rest of the BASPUG members, and spread the word!

FACEBOOK 
We are also on facebook! http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Boston-Area-SharePoint-User-Group/113652405354617
TWITTER
Follow news about the Boston Area SharePoint Users Group on twitter by following us @BASPUG, and by using the hashtag #BASPUG
WEB
Visit the Boston Area SharePoint Users Group website at http://www.bostonsharepointug.org
ORGANIZERS
Event meetings are organized by Geoff Varosky of BlueMetal and James Restivo of Crow Canyon Systems.

 

Please visit The Boston SharePoint Area Users Group page for more event details!

Creating Runbooks in Azure and Calling Them from SharePoint Using Webhooks and Flow

AzureFlowSharePointAutomationRunbooks are a feature of Azure Automation that allow you to execute workflows from within Azure or remotely to automate processes.

To give an example, lets say you have a script that monitors an Azure service every 5 minutes to see if it is running or not. The script, will test and see the status of an Azure App Service. If it tests the site, and does not get the HTTP 200/OK message, then it triggers an alert, creates a ticket, and now someone has to go recycle the Azure App Service. If this can happen frequently, then it is something you would look to automate.

In comes the Azure Automation Runbook. You create a PowerShell script that is hosted in Azure (a Runbook), and when your script detects that the service is not responding, it makes a call out to a URL, and the URL runs the Runbook, which restarts the Azure App Service. The monitoring script then runs again, sees that the service is back up, and the appropriate steps are taken.

This might seem like a lot of extra work, but, if you are, say, connecting in through a VPN to manage an Azure environment, it can be quite time consuming just to restart a service.

However, we are not using that as our working example in this article. That was just to give you an idea of the kinds of things that can be done using Runbooks. In this article, we will be showing you how to create a Runbook, and call it from SharePoint, using Microsoft Flow. It will not be a real exciting example either, but, it will show you how to do all this, so you can do more on your own!

Prerequisites

This article assumes the following:

  • You have an Azure subscription. If you do not, you can get one here for free to play around
  • You have SharePoint Online

Creating an Azure Automation Account

Before we can create our Runbook, we need to create an Azure Automation Account. Login into the Azure Portal, click on New > Monitoring + Management > Automation

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Configure the following settings for your Automation Account:

  • Name: What are you going to call it?
  • Subscription: Select the subscription to use
  • Resource Group: Either create a new one, or, use an existing.
  • Location: Which Azure region should this run in? I am using East US 2… since I’m in the East US.
  • Create Azure Run As account: This is not needed for our test, but, if you’re doing anything in Azure with your runbooks, you will want to configure this. For more information, visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/automation/automation-offering-get-started#authentication-planning

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Then press Create.

It’ll take a moment while this deploys…

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Once done… access it either by the Automation Accounts blade on the left side, or, via the Notifications link Go to resource once its done deploying.

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And you will be brought to the landing page for your Automation Account, AutomationTest

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Creating an Azure Automation Runbook

Now that we have our Automation Account, we need to create our runbook. From within the Automation Account, click on Runbooks under Process Automation on the left hand side.

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Then click Add a runbook at the top of the runbooks dashboard

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Click on Quick Create / Create a new runbook

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Fill in the details

  • Name: Check-Website
    Give your runbook a name
  • Type: PowerShell
    You can also choose Python 2, Graphical, PowerShell Workflow, and Graphical PowerShell Workflow
  • Description: Check the status of a website
    Enter in a description for the runbook

Then click on Create

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And viola! Your runbook has been created!

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It doesn’t do anything yet, so, we will need to add code. Click on Edit at the top of the dashboard.

Here is where we will type out, or paste in our PowerShell code for the runbook.

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NOTE: Do not use Write-Host, there is no “host” per-say to write to. Instead, ensure all output is written using Write-Output

Let’s add the following code to test if Google is up and running…

Function OutputStatus($type,$status) {
    Write-Output "$type | $status";
}

Function Get-HTTPSStatus($url,$type) {
    $HTTPSStatus = Invoke-WebRequest $url -Method Get –UseBasicParsing
    if ($HTTPSStatus.StatusCode -eq "200") {
        return OutputStatus -type $type -status "Success"
    } else {
        return OutputStatus -type $type -status "Error"
    }
}

Get-HTTPSStatus "http://www.google.com" "Google Website"

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Click on Save

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Now lets test it…click on Test pane

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Click on Start

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You will see a message that it is being submitted

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You can then see that it gets queued

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And finally, we see the status and the output displayed

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Pretty neat!

Now, lets say we want to add some parameters to our script, so we can specify the input… and not have it statically set as just “http://www.google.com” as the site, and “Google Website” as the description. Let’s update the code with some parameters…

To get back to your code, click on Edit PowerShell Runbook in the breadcrumb navigation at the top

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Update our code with the parameters $Site and $Description, and then Save, and then go back on over to the Test pane

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You can now see we have two fields for Site and Description under Parameters. Fill those out…

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And run the script again…

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Looks good! Now… we can do this all day from within Azure… but remember way back to the start of this article, I mentioned calling this from Microsoft Flow from within SharePoint? To do that… we’re going to need to make a change to our script, as well as create a webhook.

First, lets change our script. You know how we just added parameters? Well, when calling a webhook, we’re going to be making a REST call to a URL. We cannot pass in parameters like we just did to the script. That is good for running within Azure itself… in order to pass parameters to our runbook via a webhook… we need to change the parameters. We will be passing in an object called WebhookData (or whatever else you want to call it). Which will be the JSON data sent along with the REST call. So, let’s update our code to this:

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We will then parse out the Site and Description name/value pairs from that and pass it into our script from the $WebhookData object.

The code for the above is here:

Param (
    [object]$WebhookData
)

Function OutputStatus($type,$status) {
    Write-Output "$type | $status";
}

function Get-HTTPStatus($url,$type) {
    $HTTPStatus = Invoke-WebRequest $url -Method Get –UseBasicParsing
    if ($HTTPStatus.StatusCode -eq "200") {
        return OutputStatus -type $type -status "Success"
    } else {
        return OutputStatus -type $type -status "Error"
    }
}

if ($WebhookData -ne $null) {
    Get-HTTPStatus $WebhookData.RequestHeader.Site $WebhookData.RequestHeader.Description
} else {
    Write-Error "No data received in webhook call."
}

We need to Publish it first before creating the webhook. Go back to the code view, and click on Publish

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It will prompt you to confirm, click Yes, and it’ll be published.

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Now that we’ve got that straightened out… let’s move on to creating our webhook.

Creating a Runbook Webhook

From our runbook Dashboard, click on Webhook at the top of the dashboard

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Click on Webhook – Create a new webhook

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Then give it a name, and an expiration date, and if it should be enabled or not…

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Now… notice the big warning sign at the top of this screen…

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See? Now… copy and paste that URL at the bottom, and save it somewhere. There is no way to get this URL once the webhook has been created.

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Once you have done that, click OK

Then click on Parameters and run settings and then click OK there

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Then click Create at the bottom of the form. Until you do that, you can still get the webhook URL…

Ok… now what? Let’s call it from PowerShell, since we need to do a POST to access it.

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We can see in the Content section of the output, we are given a JobId of 4164eb1f-57ba-41c3-a7cb-2f556652e9ad

In our runbook, if we go to Jobs under Resources

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We can see that a job successfully ran

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Click on it, and we can see the status, and you will see the JobId matches what we got from the call from Invoke-WebRequest

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You will see there were errors… because we didn’t actually send any data along with it. We just called it directly. But now that we have it… we can move on to SharePoint and Flow.

Creating a Flow to Call our Webhook from SharePoint

Now that we’ve gone through the meat an potatoes of this project… let’s look at linking at all together with SharePoint and Flow.

Log into your SharePoint Online tenant… and lets create a new list.

I’ve got a basic custom list called Flowtest

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Now… once created, in the Modern interface… click on Flow > Create a flow

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Click on See your flows at the bottom, because we’re going to create a brandy-new one…

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Click on + Create from blank at the top of the page

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Click on Search at the bottom of the next screen, and search for SharePoint created… we want to add a trigger for when a new item is created in our list.

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Select SharePoint – When an item is created

Select your SharePoint Online site from the list, or, enter in the URL, then select the list… in this case, we’re using Flowtest

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Then click + New step > Add an action

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Click on HTTP under Connectors

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Choose HTTP – HTTP

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Then fill out the details…

  • Method: POST
  • Uri: The URL we copied when we created our webhook
  • Headers
    Site:
    http://www.google.com
    Description: Google’s Website (FROM SHAREPOINT!)

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And then click on Save Flow

Also… don’t forget to give your flow a name Smile

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You should now see your Flow

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Now… open a new window, and go back to your list, and create a new item…

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And if you check back on your flows…

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You will see one succeeded!

Clicking on it will give you the breakdown of the flow run (which is one of the more awesome features of Flow… over IFTTT IMHO FWIW YK?)

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Now… let’s go check Azure…

If we look at the jobs for our Runbook… we’ll see a new one in there…

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Click on it, and then click on the output

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It worked!

Now… let’s make this a bit more functional. Go back to your list settings in SharePoint

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I’ve changed the Title field to URL, and added a field called Description as a single line of text.

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Now, let’s go back to our Flow…

And edit the HTTP step

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Edit the values for Site and Description, and then select the corresponding Site and Description values from the Dynamic Content list that pops up to the right. See what we’re doing here?

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Let’s run our Flow… create a new list item, passing in a URL and Description…

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and check the status…

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It worked! It’s a day of miracles people! While this is not a really exciting example, it shows how to use Azure Runbooks and Webhooks, and how they can be accessed remotely to do a specific task.

What sort of cool things are you doing or have you done with Flow and Runbooks, if anything?

Resources and References

Creating a Chat Bot with Microsoft’s QnA Maker and Azure Bot Service

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Microsoft has a service in preview, called QnA Maker. It is a free (presently) service, which provides a REST and web-based service that trains AI to respond to questions asked of it. You’ve seen these on other sites, as these have become quite common, and ease the burden on support for SharePoint, or any other service out there. Chat bots can field common questions, freeing up time and energy spent on answering common asks.

They make it very easy to use – you can point it to a URL, type in your questions and answers, or upload a document (.docx, .doc, .pdf, .xlsx, and .tsv). The tricky part, is getting this from loading your knowledge base, to actually having a chat bot on your site. This is what this blog post is for, is to show you how to do it. They do have directions, but not a full walk-through on what to do.

This post assumes that you have at the very least, an Azure Account. If not, you can start one for free.

QnA Maker Setup

First, go to http://qnamaker.ai, this is where you will get started. Click on Create New Service

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Then sign in with a Microsoft ID, or organizational account like you would into Azure, Office365, Outlook.com, etc.

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It will then ask you to provide permissions to QnAMaker, click Accept

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Then you must agree to the terms and privacy statement, check the box and hit Continue

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Enter in a name for your bot. I am choosing Testbot 9001

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You now have 3 options for loading data into your Chat Bot…

  1. From a URL that links to a resource which has a clear Q&A format, like a FAQ
  2. From a file, in Question/Answer format (supported file types are .TSV*, .PDF, .DOC, .DOCX, and .XLSX format)
    *TSV stands for Tab Separated Values. Like a CSV, but, you know, with Tabs. You can do this in Excel.
  3. Enter them in manually

For our Testbot 9001, we will be uploading from Excel. So, let’s create a new Excel file. In the first column, type in the question, or phrase, which the chatbot AI will hit on and use to provide the answer. Use the second column to provide that answer. Here is my example file:

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Now, save the file. And go back to the QnA Maker setup, and choose Select file… next to the FILES section

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and select the XLSX file from your local computer you just saved

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Then scroll to the bottom and select Create

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You will then see a dialog window appear while the service scans your file, and imports your Questions and Answers
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Once complete, it will take you to the Testbot 9001 Knowledgebase.

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Select Test from the side bar, and you can test the functionality with your questions
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Cool, huh? The testing also allows you to train the bot as well. Such as choosing the best answer based upon what you had typed
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Or providing multiple alternative phrasings, or synonyms

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When done, click Save and Retrain to save your changes

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You can see back in the main Knowledgebase, that it has been updated by what we asked and what we updated the suggestions and phrasings with

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You can also add new Q & A pairs by clicking on Add new QnA pair

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When done, Save & Retrain again to save your settings.

Once you are ready… click Publish

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It will then show you what will be published… and then when ready, click Publish

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The deployment confirmation screen will show you the example HTTP request for using your bot through the REST API. These are also available in the Settings link on the sidebar of the Knowledgebase.

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We will need some f this information in a few minutes, so take down the Knowledgebase ID

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And the Subscription Key

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and put those aside for a few minutes…

Azure Bot Service Setup

Next we’re going to use the Azure Bot Service to setup our bot. To do so, we’ll be following these instructions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/bot-framework/bot-service-quickstart

Log into the Azure Portal

Click on New > AI + Cognitive Services > Web App Bot

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Now, let’s configure the botimage

  • Name: Testbot9001
    So you can identify the soldiers in your bot army!
  • Subscription: GeoffOps
    Choose your own subscription. This one is mine. You can’t have it.
  • Resource Group: Testbot9001
    Use an existing or create a new one
  • Location: East US
    Select the data center region you would like to use
  • Pricing Tier:  FO (10K Premium Messages)
    This defaults to S1 Standard, change this to F0 Free. Or else you will pay for the service
  • App Name: Testbot9001
  • Bot template:  Question and Answer
  • App service plan/Location: Testbot9001
    You will need to create a new one, or use an existing. For this example, I created a new one also in East US
  • Azure Storage: testbot9001a325
    I am letting Azure create a new one for me. This is a data storage account, like a fileshare. You can use an existing one if you have one as well.
  • Application Insights: Off
    This is not free. So I turned it off.

Then click Create to bring life to your Azure Bot. I twill validate your choices, and then when complete, will begin deployment.

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When deployment has completed, you can find the bot and associates Azure resources under the All Resources blade of the left, or, if you have other stuff in Azure, go to the Resource Groups blade, and click on your Resource Group we created in the Bot setup above. In my case, the Resource Group is Testbot9001

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Ok. So, we’ve created our bot with QnA Maker, and created a Bot Service in Azure… now what? We need to connect the two.

Select your bot, it’ll be the one which has a TYPE of Web App Bot

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On the left hand side, click on APP SERVICE SETTINGS > Application Settings

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And then scroll down to App settings. You will see two blank settings called QnAKnowledgebaseId and QnASubscriptionKey

Now, remember those things we copied off earlier? Pate these in there.

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And then click Save up top

ScreenClip

Now, click on Test in Web Chat on the left side, and test out your new bot!

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Pretty neat! But… now what?

Click on Channels on the left side. You will see Web Chat setup and running by default. You can also see, you can extend this out to Teams, Skype, and more pretty easily.

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Click on Edit, and copy the Embed Code

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And show one of the keys at the top

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and replace the YOUR_SECRET_HERE in the embed code

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And you can now drop that into a site, web part, whatever you’d like. It’s just an iFrame, so the possibilities are endless.

A simple example – using Embed Code on a SharePoint page:

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Would I implement it like this for a client? Likely not… I’d be more apt to have a sliding pop-up window, similar to Facebook chats that can be minimized and maximized as needed. This was just an example to show how to build one of these.

 

References

May 2014 #CollabTalk TweetJam On Hybrid SharePoint

Reposted from: http://www.buckleyplanet.com/2014/05/may-2014-collabtalk-tweetjam-on-hybrid-sharepoint.html

As organizations look to the future of their existing SharePoint environments, questions about hybrid deployments come up again and again. For this month’s #CollabTalk tweetjam, scheduled for May 29th at 9am Pacific / 12pm Eastern we have an all-start panel of experts who will be tackling this topic, CollabTalk May 2014answering questions, and sharing their real-life experiences. Our theme will be “What It Takes to Get Hybrid SharePoint Right,” and we want your questions and feedback during this one-hour online event.

As organizations begin to seriously consider the future of their existing SharePoint infrastructure, some are moving directly to the cloud and Office365, while others are looking to extend their infrastructure investments, protect sensitive data, and/or maintain the level of control they have over line of business (LOB) integrations and other customizations. The long-and-short of it is that hybrid SharePoint deployments will be around for some time, and Microsoft will continue to support on premises deployments for the foreseeable future. In this month’s tweetjam panel, we’ll talk about the business reasoning behind the decisions to go hybrid, while also shedding some light on the roadblocks and realities of keeping one foot on prem and the other foot in the cloud.

If you’re new to the tweetjam model, basically its an hour-long public conversation held on Twitter and using a shared hash tag, which is #CollabTalk. You can use your Twitter platform of choice OR go over to http://twubs.com/CollabTalk which automatically appends each message with #CollabTalk, and has a nice feature that allows followers to actually slow the dialog down to a readable speed (it can fly by fairly quickly). The questions we will be discussing are listed below:

"What It Takes to Get Hybrid SharePoint Right"

  • As companies transition toward the cloud, how important will hybrid become?
  • What are the most common hybrid SharePoint scenarios?
  • How much of hybrid SharePoint is platform versus services?
  • Is a hybrid search deployment difficult, and if so, what are the pain points?
  • What are the top 3 road blocks for adopting a hybrid SharePoint model?
  • What features/solutions should Microsoft focus on to improve hybrid deployments?
  • What advice would you give to an admin considering a hybrid SharePoint environment?

As always, we will have an extensive all-star panel of experts on hand to participate in the conversation and to interact with you directly – but anyone can jump in and participate. So don’t be shy — share your own perspective and company or customer experiences, or just lurk. It’s all good. But be sure to mark your calendars, tell your colleagues, and get involved!

Our panel this month will include:

  • Dave Coleman (@dcoleman146), SharePoint MVP and director at SharePointEduTech
  • Ben Curry (@curryben), SharePoint MVP, principal architect and managing partner at Summit 7 Systems
  • Bradley Geldenhuys (@bradgcoza), SharePoint Jedi at GTConsult
  • Asif Rehmani (@asifrehmani), consultant, trainer and SharePoint MVP at SharePoint-Videos
  • Tamir Orbach (@tamirorbach), director of product management at Metalogix
  • Naomi Moneypenny (@nmoneypenny), cto at ManyWorlds
  • Dan Holme (@danholme), SharePoint MVP, evangelist, and co-founder of ITUnity
  • Jeffrey Schwartz (@jeffreyschwartz), editor of Redmond Magazine and editor-at-large for Redmond Channel Partner magazine
  • Edin Kapic (@ekapic), SharePoint MVP and architect at Spenta
  • Adis Jugo (@adisjugo), SharePoint MVP, Top 25 SharePoint Influencer 😛 and head of development at deroso Solutions
  • Dan Usher (@binarybrewery), SharePoint MVP, implementation engineer and architect at Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Kanwal Khipple (@kkhipple), SharePoint MVP and director of digital strategy at Envision IT
  • Hans Brender (@hansbrender), SharePoint MVP and ceo of sqtm PSC GmbH
  • Robert Bogue (@robbogue), SharePoint MVP, author and consultant
  • Juan Carlos Gonzalez Martin (@jcgm1978), SharePoint MVP, co-director of the magazine CompartiMOSS, consultant and solution architect at LKS
  • Ivan Sanders (@iasanders), SharePoint MVP, developer and consultant
  • Adam Preston (@_apreston), manager of collaboration and cloud services at TCSC, and president of the Richmond SharePoint Users Group
  • Jason Ruthkoski (@jasonruthkoski), team lead, portals and collaboration at Slalom Consulting
  • Eric Riz (@rizinsights), evp at Concatenate and SharePoint MVP
  • Jeff Fried (@jefffried), cto and vp of engineering at BA Insight
  • Jennifer Mason (@jennifermason), SharePoint MVP and consultant at Rackspace
  • Geoff Varosky (@gvaro), managing consultant at Jornata, president of Boston Area SharePoint Group, and co-founder of Boston Office365 User Group
  • Fabian Williams (@fabianwilliams), SharePoint MVP and senior consultant at Planet Technologies
  • Michael Herman (@mwherman2000), principal architect at Parallelspace
  • Laura Rogers (@wonderlaura),  SharePoint MVP and consultant at Rackspace
  • Jared Shockley (@jshoq), senior systems engineer at Microsoft
  • Alistair Pugin (@alistairpugin), SharePoint MVP and independent consultant
  • Chris Beckett (@teknirvana), founder of obeflow and SharePoint MCM
  • Richard Harbridge (@rharbridge), partner technology advisor and strategist at Microsoft
  • Paul Swider (@pswider), cto at RealActivity and enterprise SharePoint strategist
  • Todd Klindt (@toddklindt), SharePoint MVP and consultant at Rackspace
  • Thomas Carpe (@thomascarpe), principal SharePoint architect at Liquid Mercury Solutions
  • Robert Toro (@SharePointToro), SharePoint practice director at Slalom
  • Warren Marks (@MarksWazza), director at GTconsult
  • and myself as your host and moderator (@buckleyplanet), SharePoint MVP and chief evangelist at Metalogix

I am excited to once again have a lively debate, and look forward to the interaction on #CollabTalk. My plan is to provide a summary of the discussion on the ITUnity.com site within the next few days, so watch for an update via my Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn updates. See you online this Thursday at Twubs.com/CollabTalk

Boston Office 365 Group Launch

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Are you curious about Office 365? What it is, how it can save you time and help you be more productive? Are you getting the full benefits of all that Office 365 has to offer?

One of the ways for people to get the most out of this new and constantly evolving suite of products is to have people to turn to; a place to go to explore new features and functionality or just learn more, share experiences and ask questions. Formal training is great (we strongly encourage ongoing training for users of the Office 365 suite of products), but there are times when you just want to interact with others or ask a simple question.

Help has arrived. Jornata is pleased to be a founding organizer of the Boston Office 365 User Group. Our co-organizers include Microsoft, Wellington Street Consulting, Slalom Consulting and Cognizant Technology Solutions. The group will met monthly, beginning on Thursday, May 22nd, and on the third Thursday of every month thereafter. The event will take place at Microsoft’s New England Research and Development Center (NERD) at One Memorial Drive in Cambridge. Attendance is free and food and beverages will be provided. You can learn more and register for the meeting or join the mailing list.

Fittingly, for the initial event, Microsoft’s Chris Bortlik will present an overview of Office 365. His discussion will include an overview of current Office 365 functionality, including Yammer, Lync Online, mobile applications and Office 365 Pro Plus. He’ll also explore administration and update issues. Chris is an Office 365 technology architect at Microsoft.

There are plenty of ways to keep the conversation going. We have a web site, Linked In group and Yammer group, or you can follow us on Twitter @Bos365.

We want this to be your group. Feedback, ideas, and suggestions are welcome. What topics would you like to see the group address? Are there other elements that you feel should be added to the program? We’ll provide a place to air your grievances and perhaps learn how others have dealt with the issues you’ve encountered.

We’re also looking for event sponsors to provide food, beverages and raffle prizes for the events or pick up the tab for the Office 365 Happy Hour that will follow each meeting at a local bar or restaurant. If you’re interested, or know anyone who might be, please contact us.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Creating a Licensed Users View in Office 365

In Office 365, when managing users and groups under the Office 365 Admin Center, they have several canned views you can use to filter the list of employees and groups that you see.

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One which is not there by default, which is a custom view, is Licensed Users. You can easily create views or edit existing views by using the menu items at the bottom. In this case, we are going to create a New view

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First, just like any other view in SharePoint, you need to give the view a name. In this case, I used Licensed Users

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I’ve left every other option blank except for Assigned license. I’ve changed this field to reflect my client’s license plan, which is the E3 license.

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Click Save, and you’re good to go.

If you have multiple licenses in use, you will need to create multiple views, as it is a single selection drop-down.

I have a Public SharePoint Online site?

Yes. Yes you do. Well, if you have Office 365 and it is part of the license which you purchased. You didn’t have to do anything, you have a public facing (anyone on the internet can hit it just like a normal website) website.

Where is it?

It’s easy to find. Go into the SharePoint Online Admin Center

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Select the first link on the left side navigation (the default) site collections

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And in the listing on the right side of the page, it will be listed first under Public Website

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The default URL will be http://yourtenantname-public.sharepoint.com.

And if you go there…You’ll see a nice SharePointy and Cloudy site…

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Oh Cool! Now I can create a website like Ferrari in Office 365/SharePoint Online????

No. As of yet, SharePoint Online in Office 365 does not contain all of the super awesome Web Content Management and publishing controls that SharePoint 20XX on-premises does.

Oh…

Yep.

Ok, the public website is enough for my needs, can I create more than one?

No. Once you have one created, you cannot create another one. It will appear greyed out when attempting to create a new site collection.

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Oh…

Yep.

Enabling Office on Demand in SharePoint Online

Office on Demand is a new feature in SharePoint Online on Office 365. Straight from the link, from the horses’ mouth so to speak:

Office on Demand is a feature that provides online access to full rich Office desktop applications, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, when you’re using a PC that doesn’t have the latest version of Office installed locally. Office on Demand is available to anyone who has an Office 365 subscription that includes the Office application suite. Office 365 subscriptions that include the Office applications let you install on up to five devices for use both online and offline. Office on Demand is a helpful option if you want to use your Office applications on an additional device or on a device that you don’t own, such as when you’re logged in as a guest using someone else’s computer.

This also works in environments where thin clients are used such as a Citrix or kiosk based setup where users cannot install software, and license management can become quite the hassle if multiple users are using the same server to do their work each day.

To enable or disable Office on Demand

Go into your SharePoint Online Admin Center

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and select Settings from the left-side navigation

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And then scroll down to the Office on Demand header to enable or disable the functionality.

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