Advertisements

TEST OUT YOUR POWERSHELL SCRIPTS FIRST IN A NON-PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT FIRST


You may be wondering why I applied such bad grammar to the title of this post, it came from a comment on this: https://www.nothingbutsharepoint.com/sites/itpro/Pages/Seven-Virtues-for-the-SharePoint-IT-Pro.aspx

PowerShell is a beast. Sure, it’s hard to learn the syntax, and there are 600+ commands that come along with SharePoint 2010. But, it also gives you direct access to the API for SharePoint. Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, under any circumstances what-so-ever, run un-tested PowerShell code in a production environment. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever. ever.

What may have worked for one person, in which they have posted it on their blog, mailing list, or company-wide fax – it should be tested first, in a non-production environment.

It may work fine, sure, but, it may also grind everything to a halt, and end your career.

In closing, re-read the above, and make it your mantra. No go fourth, SharePoint admins (and devs – yes you too), and prosper.

Advertisements

About Geoff Varosky
Geoff Varosky is a Senior Architect for BlueMetal Architects, based out of Watertown, MA. He has been architecting and developing web based applications his entire career, and has been working with SharePoint for the past 13 years. Geoff is an active member of the SharePoint community, Co-Founder and Co-Organizer of the Boston Area SharePoint Users Group, co-founder for the Boston Office 365 Users Group, co-organizer for SharePoint Saturday Boston and speaks regularly at SharePoint events and user groups.

4 Responses to TEST OUT YOUR POWERSHELL SCRIPTS FIRST IN A NON-PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT FIRST

  1. Anders Rask says:

    And before running it on your test env, UNDERSTAND what the script does. Copy pasting random scripts from the internet and runing them on the farm without really understanding what they do is an even worse practice 😉
    Yes PowerShell is powerful, so in the hand of the novice its downright dangerous. I try to do all PowerShell development on a dedicated dev environment that i wipe ever so often to keep it stable.

    • Yes, not only important to test, but, to also understand. Thanks Anders!

  2. Pingback: LotD: Using PowerShell to Approve List Items « Geoff Varosky's Blog

  3. Pingback: PowerShell script to list all Webs and Site Templates in use within a Site Collection « Geoff Varosky's Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: